It almost feels generational. There are kids, parents and the teachers and the blame for bad results in education shifts from one to the other generationally. When I was young, teachers and parents were a team working for the kids, now more and more often you see parents blame teachers.

kids school

In have no idea what was before but now we are surely living in a ‘full blame society’ that instead of looking for solutions, spends all the effort on looking someone to blame.

Here is how you should look at it:

1. No one is to blame. Focus on improving the process rather than blaming.

2. Forget teaching facts. Guide kids towards critical thinking.

Take care of the fundamentals

I personally know families that expect the kindergarten or school to do everything. But guess what? If you never check upon your child, you will miss a lot. This is an especially prominent issue in families with a single caregiver

Check upon your child, help them do homework and find appropriate processes to keep up at school, even when they get sick or are on holidays.

When to side with the teachers

teacher

Being from a large family myself, and having raised two of my own, I have seen teachers of every kind. Some hold their positions for way too long and all they do now is push blame on kids. But sometimes your teen is just being lazy. Trust me, when a parent can’t ask the teacher, it is so easy for a kid to come up with his side of the story.

That’s why, and you may hate them all you want, parent teacher conferences are so important. The better you know the teachers, the better you know the truth.

Don’t Assume the Position of Omnipotence

Being always right is hard. Trying to do so will only make you like a hypocrite. So, sometimes it is better to stand back and let the kids be kids, and let teachers teach.

It is hard for hand on parents like me, but you must, if only to see if the machine you are trying to build is working fine. You won’t know for sure but standing back will allow you to see whether it is at least keeping in its tracks.